EnglishDeutsch

Mirjam Jenny

Mirjam Jenny

jenny [at] mpib-berlin [dot] mpg [dot] de
+49 (0)30 82406-720
227
Head Research Scientist

Curriculum Vitae

Mirjam Jenny is the Head Research Scientist at the Harding Center for Risk Literacy at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development. She enjoys research at the intersection of psychology, computer science, and medicine. Currently, she is developing decision aids for the medical domain, for example, fast and frugal decision trees for emergency medicine and anesthesiology using machine learning methods. She is interested in medical decision making and risk literacy as well as digital health and has additional experience in cognitive modeling of subjective probability. Being actively engaged in the German health care landscape she hopes to improve medical decision making for patients, doctors, and institutions. Finally, she enjoys conceptual work, for example, on process models and risk communication. Her research has been featured in media outlets in Europe and the United States.

 

since 2016

Head Research Scientist at the Harding Center for Risk Literacy at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development

2015

Data Scientist at the The National Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians (Kassenärztliche Bundesvereinigung) in Berlin

2013-2014

Post doctoral researcher at the Center for Adaptive Rationality at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development

2013

PhD, Doctor of Philosophy (Psychology), University of Basel, Switzerland

2009

Master of Science in Psychology, University of Basel, Switzerland

2007

Bachelor of Science in Psychology, University of Basel, Switzerland

 

Selected publications

Arabin, B., Timmesfeld, N., Noever, K., Behnam, S., Ellermann, C., & Jenny, M. A. (2018). How to improve health literacy to reduce short- and long-term consequences of maternal obesity? The Journal of Maternal-Fetal & Neonatal Medicine. Advance online publication. doi:10.1080/14767058.2018.1450383
Full text

Jenny, M. A., Keller, N., & Gigerenzer, G. (2018). Assessing minimal medical statistical literacy using the Quick Risk Test: A prospective observational study in Germany. BMJ Open, 8:e020847. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2017-020847
Full text

Jenny, M. A., Keller, N., & Gigerenzer, G. (2018). Correction: Assessing minimal medical statistical literacy using the Quick Risk Test: A prospective observational study in Germany [BMJ Open, 8:e020847 (2018) doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-020847]. BMJ Open, 8:e020847corr2. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2017-020847corr2
Full text

Keller, N., Jenny, M. A., Gigerenzer, G., & Ablin, R. J. (2018). PSA-Screening: Möglicher Nutzen und Schaden. Deutsches Ärzteblatt, 115, A 583-A 587.
Full text

Jenny, M. A., Hertwig R., Ackermann, S., Messmer, A. S., Nickel. Ch. H. & Bingisser, R. (2015). Are morbidity and mortality predictable in patients presenting with nonspecific complaints using routine variables? Academic Emergency Medicine, 22, 1155-1163. doi:10.1111/acem.12755

van den Bos, W., Jenny, M. A. & Wulf, D. U. (2014). Open minded psychology. In: Moore, S. A. (ed.) Issues in Open Research Data. Pp. 107–127. London: Ubiquity Press. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5334/ban.g

Jenny, M. A., Rieskamp, J., & Nilsson, H. (2014). Inferring conjunctive probabilities from experienced noisy samples: Evidence from the configural weighted average model. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 40, 203–217. doi:10.1037/a0034261

Jenny, M. A., Pachur, T., Williams, L., Becker, E., & Margraf, J. (2013). Simple rules for detecting depression. Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, 2, 149-157. doi:10.1016/j.jarmac.2013.06.001

Nilsson, H., Rieskamp, J., & Jenny, M. A. (2013). Exploring the overestimation of conjunctive probabilities. Frontiers in Psychology, 101, 1-12. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00101

Fuchs, H. M., Jenny, M., & Fiedler, S. (2012). Psychologists are open to change, yet wary of rules. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 7, 639–642. doi:10.1177/1745691612459521

 

Selected awards

She has been awarded with the Emilie Louise Frey Prize for best dissertation by the Basel Association of Female Academics and the Basel Association of Female University Lecturers and with the Otto Hahn Medal for best dissertation related research by the Max Planck Society.